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Proclamation: April 1st, 2015 

Proclamation of Controlled Act: The Controlled Act has not been proclaimed.

Click here to read about the history of regulation in Ontario.

Title – Registered Psychotherapist

Regulatory Authority  College of Registered Psychotherapists of Ontario (CRPO)

Type of Regulation – Title Protection (proclaimed) AND Activity Protection (pending)

Definitions

Indirect Client Hours
Not defined

Direct Client Hours
Not defined, but specifically referenced in the Registration Reg – will need to be defined in policy or guidelines.

Supervision
Clinical Supervision:

  • a contractual relationship in which a clinical supervisor engages with a supervisee to safeguard the welfare of the client; discuss the direction of therapy and the therapeutic relationship; promote the professional growth of the supervisee; and enhance the supervisee’s safe and effective use of self in the therapeutic relationship. Clinical supervision may be individual, dyadic or group, defined as follows:
    • Individual (one clinical supervisor to one supervisee)
    • Dyadic (one clinical supervisor to two supervisees)
    • Group (one clinical supervisor to no more than eight supervisees).

Case Supervision
The oversight of a practitioner’s clinical work by a supervisor or manager in order to protect the safety and well-being of clients served by the practitioner, usually in an agency or institutional context. The purpose of the supervision is the oversight of casework and may include case conferences, inter-disciplinary rounds and team meetings. Enhancing competency and promoting professional growth and development may be a by-product of the supervisory relationship. A case supervisor may be, but is not required to be, a clinical supervisor.

Managerial / Administrative Supervision
Not defined in the regulation; may be defined in policy or guidelines

Supervised Practice Setting
means a structured workplace, normally an agency, institution or community service provider, which has a system of built-in managerial oversight and professional accountability.

Supervision of a person fulfilling the requirements to become a member of the profession
The Regulated Health Professions Act provides a specific exception that permits persons entering the profession to work under the supervision or direction of a member of the profession while fulfilling the requirements to become a member of a health profession.

Internship
Not defined.

Clinical Supervisor
Prior to proclamation, a “clinical supervisor” is a practitioner who has extensive clinical experience, generally five years or more, in the practice of psychotherapy.

In the first three years following proclamation, a “clinical supervisor” is a regulated practitioner in good standing authorized by his or her College to perform the controlled act of psychotherapy, who has extensive clinical experience, generally five years or more, in the practice of psychotherapy.

From that day forward, a “clinical supervisor” is a regulated practitioner in good standing authorized by his or her College to perform the controlled act of psychotherapy, who has extensive clinical experience, generally five years or more, in the practice of psychotherapy, and who has successfully completed a course in providing clinical supervision.

Currency  Hours (formerly “practicing the profession”)
Currency hours include direct client contact. They also include record-keeping, preparation, research, consultation and professional development in relation to direct client contact. In addition, currency hours include teaching, supervision, conducting research, or writing in the field of psychotherapy, or managing, consulting or other professional activities that impact the practice of psychotherapy.

Practicum/Field Placement
Not yet defined.

Scope of Practice

The practice of psychotherapy is the assessment and treatment of cognitive, emotional or behavioural disturbances by psychotherapeutic means, delivered through a therapeutic relationship based primarily on verbal or non-verbal communication.

Controlled/Reserved Act

In the course of engaging in the practice of psychotherapy, a member is authorized, subject to the terms, conditions and limitations imposed on his or her certificate of registration, to treat, by means of psychotherapy technique delivered through a therapeutic relationship, an individual’s serious disorder of thought, cognition, mood, emotional regulation, perception or memory that may seriously impair the individual’s judgement, insight, behaviour, communication or social functioning.

Please note that the controlled/reserved act has not been proclaimed yet.

Education

Requirements differ for applicants using the time-limited grandparenting route to registration for current, active practitioners in Canada (previously in Ontario); see section on grandparenting, below.

Education & Training Program :
Successful completion of:

i. a structured, coherent program of education and training in psychotherapy which has as a prerequisite an undergraduate degree and which includes 360 hours of training and education central to the practice of psychotherapy, which hours exclude direct client contact hours and clinical supervision hours, and which program is recognized by the Registration Committee or by a body that is approved by the Registration Committee, or

ii. a master’s degree, which includes at least 10 semester courses (360 hours) of training and education central to the practice of psychotherapy, which hours exclude direct client contact hours and clinical supervision hours, and which degree is recognized by the Registration Committee or by a body that is approved by the Registration Committee, or

iii a program in Indigenous practice of psychotherapy recognized by the Registration Committee or by a body that is approved by the Registration Committee, or

iv. a program that is deemed by the Registration Committee to be substantially equivalent to a program referred to in subparagraph i or ii, or education and training that may be comprised of one or more programs, that when viewed in its entirety, is deemed by the Registration Committee to be substantially equivalent to a program referred to in subparagraph i or ii.

Clinical Experience:
Completion of a minimum of 450 direct client contact hours and 100 hours of clinical supervision (individual, dyadic or group).

A minimum of 50 hours must be individual or dyadic clinical supervision; the remainder may be group supervision (max. 8 supervisees per group).

Exams
Must complete the Professional Practice and Jurisprudence e-Learning Module and the Registration (entry-to-practice) exam.

Safe and Effective Use of Self:
Must have competed education/training components that develop competency in the safe and effective use of self in the psychotherapeutic relationship, (as described in section 5.(1) 1 of the draft Registration Regulation): “… one of the defining competencies of psychotherapy practice: the therapist’s learned capacity to understand his or her own subjective context and patterns of interaction as they inform his or her participation in the therapeutic relationship with the client. It also speaks to the therapist’s self-reflective use of his or her personality, insights, perceptions, and judgments in order to optimize interactions with clients in the therapeutic process.”

Identified as a key competency; included in entry-to-practice competency profile, and incorporated into education training programs.

“The Registration Committee or a body approved by the Registration Committee shall not recognize a program unless one of its core components is to develop competency in the safe and effective use of self in the psychotherapeutic relationship.”

Supervision

Pre-licensure:
Currency
must have completed education/ training program, or clinical experience requirement, (450 client contact hours + 100 hours of clinical supervision) within 12 months prior to application; OR have 750 currency hours within previous 3 years OR completed acceptable upgrading activities.

NOTE: Currency hours include a broad range of professional activities, including direct client contact & related record-keeping, preparation, research, consultation, teaching, supervising, researching, writing, and managing.

NOTE: Candidates who are:

1) enrolled to take the registration exam, having successfully completed an education/ training program that meets specific requirements (see below); or

2) completing additional education, training or clinical experience requirements, having substantially completed an education/ training program that meets specific requirements.

May apply for the Qualifying category. Qualifying members must complete the Professional Practice and Jurisprudence e-Learning Module and the Registration (Entry-to-Practice) exam. Safe and effective use of self can be demonstrated through completion of education/training program.

Licensure:
May not practise without clinical supervision until the member has completed an additional 550 direct client contact hours and an additional 50 hours of clinical supervision.

Post-Licensure
Once independent practice requirements are met, clinical supervision is not required; however, all members must participate annually in the College’s Quality Assurance Program to demonstrate continued competency.

Grandparenting

Time-limited option (available until March 31st, 2017); open to established practitioners in Canada (formerly in Ontario).

Grandparented Members will be:

  • Full members
  • Permitted to use earned, recognized specialty designations.
  • May not practise without clinical supervision until completing a total of 1000 direct client contact hours and 150 hours of clinical supervision (the same as for regular applicants).
  • Must provide a portfolio of evidence of relevant education, training and clinical experience related to the scope of practice of psychotherapy.
  • Portfolio information will be evaluated using a point system and weighted scale; applicants must achieve a total minimum score through combined scores for education/ training, clinical experience, supervision and other professional activities.

Minimum requirements:

  • 100 hours education/ training related to the scope of practice of psychotherapy
  • 800 direct client contact hours
  • 40 hours supervision, including min. 20 hours clinical supervision
  • 30 hours education/ training and/or experiential learning in the “safe & effective use of self”
  • Other professional activities (possible bonus points).
  • Must successfully complete the Professional Practice and Jurisprudence e-Learning Module
  • Not required to write the Registration (entry-to-practice) Exam.
Language

Reasonable fluency (speak, read, write) in English or French.

Currency

Initial applicants (except for the Qualifying or Inactive categories of membership): completion of education and training program, or clinical experience requirement (450 client contact hours plus 100 hours of clinical supervision) within 12 months prior to the date of application; or applicant must have completed 750 currency hours, within the 3 years prior to application orcompletion of approved upgrading activities.

NOTE: Currency hours include a broad range of professional activities, including direct client contact and related record-keeping, preparation, research, consultation, teaching, supervising, researching, writing, and managing.

Grandparenting applicants must also have 750 currency hours (500 in Canada) during 3 years prior to application, which may include a broad range of professional activities, including direct client contact and related record-keeping, preparation, research, consultation; teaching, supervising, researching, writing, and managing.

Disqualification Considerations

(Disclosure of information requirement):

  • Finding of guilt for criminal offence or any offence resulting in a fine of more than $1000 or a custodial sentence
  • Finding of professional misconduct, incompetency or incapacity by regulatory body or professional association
  • Finding of professional negligence or malpractice
  • Refusal by a professional association or regulatory body to register
  • Statement of good standing with a professional association or regulatory body
  • Any other event that could reflect on the applicant’s or member’s ability to practice safely and professionally
  • Must carry professional liability insurance
  • False or misleading representation or declaration
  • Lack of response by a member when requested
  • As an outcome of Quality Assurance, Discipline or capacity processes
QA/Continuing Education

Quality Assurance program requirements have not yet been established but will include (per Regulated Health Professions Act and Quality Assurance Regulation):

  • Self, peer and practice assessments; and
  • A mechanism for the College to monitor members’ participation.
Misconduct Regulations

Applicants: successful completion of a Professional Practice and Jurisprudence e-Learning Module.Members: compliance with the Professional Misconduct Regulation that sets out behaviours and activities that are unsafe, unethical or unprofessional.The following are acts of professional misconduct (tightly condensed from the Professional Misconduct Regulation):

  1. Contravening a standard of practice;
  2. Abusing a client;
  3. Treating a client without informed consent;
  4. Failing to reply to a client request for information;
  5. Giving information about a client to a 3rd party without consent;
  6. Discontinuing services without reasonable regard for client condition, availability of alternate services, client’s opportunity to arrange alternate services, and reason for discontinuing.
  7. Recommending, providing or continuing a treatment unnecessarily.
  8. Treating a condition that falls outside area of competence.
  9. Failing to refer client to another professional when client’s condition is beyond the member’s competence.
  10. Performing a controlled act that is not authorized to the member.
  11. Failing to provide appropriate supervision.
  12. Delegating the authorized act (also called the “controlled act”), except in exceptional circumstances, and only with approval of Council.
  13. Counselling/assisting a non-member to represent him/herself as a member or to perform controlled acts.
  14. Failing to advise a client/ individual of his/her right to file a complaint.
  15. Failing to provide a client/ individual with College contact information.
  16. Being in a conflict-of-interest when acting in a professional capacity (conflict-of-interest will be elaborated in standards & guidelines.)
  17. Issuing a false or misleading invoice.
  18. Charging excessive fees.
  19. Charging more than the usual fee when a third party is paying.
  20. Providing a service without first advising client of the fee or any penalties for late payment of fee.
  21. Charging a block fee without specifying in writing: services covered, amount, payment arrangements, rights and obligations if relationship is terminated before services are provided.
  22. Providing a reduction for prompt payment.
  23. Failing to an itemize account for goods or services, upon request.
  24. Breaching an agreement with the client relating to services or fees.
  25. Failing to keep records in accordance with professional standards (record- keeping will be elaborated on in standards & guidelines.)
  26. Signing or issuing documents with false or misleading statements.
  27. Falsifying a record.
  28. Making an unsupportable claim about an approach, treatment or device.
  29. Permitting advertising that is false, misleading, not factual and not verifiable.
  30. Using a client’s testimonial in advertising.
  31. Soliciting, unless the subject of the solicitation is advised that the purpose of the communication is to solicit [potential clients to the member’s practice] and that the individual solicited may end the communication at any time he/she wishes. The communication must end immediately if the subject so elects.
  32. Influencing a client to change a will or other testamentary instrument.
  33. Inappropriately using a term, title or designation.
  34. Inappropriately using a term, title or designation indicating/implying a specialization.
  35. Using a name other than that entered in the register.
  36. Failing to use the title designated by the College.
  37. Failing to provide a report/certificate relating to a treatment performed by the member, after such has been requested by the client.
  38. Failing to provide appropriate notice to each client of the intended closure of the member’s practice; or to ensure that client’s records are transferred to the member’s successor or another member, if the client so requests; or to ensure that client records are retained or disposed of securely.
  39. Failing to report an incident of unsafe practice by another member.
  40. Making a report of a suspected incident of unsafe practice in which the client’s name is mentioned, unless client consent has been obtained, or disclosure is required by law.
  41. Practicing while impaired by any condition, dysfunction or substance.
  42. Contravening a provision of the Act or the RHPA.
  43. Contravening a law in Canada, if the purpose of the law is to protect/promote public health or the contravention is relevant to the member’s suitability to practise.
  44. Contravening a term, condition or limitation on the certificate of registration.
  45. Practicing while the member’s certificate of registration is suspended.
  46. Benefiting from the practice of the profession while the member’s certificate is suspended, unless a full disclosure is made to the College and prior approval is obtained from the Executive Committee.
  47. Failing to comply with an order of a panel of the College.
  48. Failing to appear before a panel of the Inquiries, Complaints & Reports Committee (ICRC).
  49. Failing to carry out or abide by an undertaking given to the College.
  50. Failing to reply within 30 days to an inquiry/request from the College.
  51. Selling or assigning debt.
  52. Engaging in disgraceful, dishonourable or unprofessional conduct.
  53. Engaging in conduct unbecoming of a member of the profession.
  54. Failing to communicate with a client’s other relevant health care providers respecting the client’s care, unless the client refuses consent, or such communication is counter-therapeutic or unnecessary.

Providing services through electronic communications technology, unless the client provides informed consent; the member has professional liability insurance coverage for such services, and the member takes reasonable steps to ensure the technology employed is secure, confidential and appropriate.

The following resources may help you to organize for completion of the application.

You may wish to read the application information found on the CRPO website to assist you in understanding the process as it is currently envisioned.

1. You must have an account with the CRPO.

2. All applicants must complete the E-jurisprudence module.

The E-jurisprudence module will require you to pay $60 plus tax. Please note that CRPO does not accept credit cards or cheques. Payment must be made via bank transfer. It can take up to three days to process your payment. Therefore, you should ensure adequate time for your payment to be processed prior to your commencement of the module.

The E-jurisprudence module is a wonderful learning tool. However, it will take you four to six hours or possibly longer to complete. You should allow sufficient time to complete the module so that you are ready for pre-registration when it is available.

3. The application form will require a great deal of data. It would be helpful for you to gather this data prior to starting the process. Please see an example below of one method of gathering this information (CRPO Portfolio – PowerPoint Model). Below you will also see some sample templates that may assist you in gathering the data for parts of your portfolio.

4. The application process will allow you to stop and save your work should you be interrupted during your application. The current understanding is that it will take several hours to complete the application and having your portfolio prepared ahead of time will ensure that you complete the form as efficiently as possible.

5. Your portfolio will not be sent to CRPO upon application, but rather should be kept handy in the event that your documents are requested by the CRPO.

6. All documents sent to the CRPO must be scanned. Hard copies should not be sent to the CRPO offices. When you register, you will be given a barcode and this barcode must apear on all documents sent to the CRPO.

7. For those CCPA members who are certified (CCC), CCPA has scanned all of the documentation that you sent to CCPA to substantiate your application. Please contact the National Office ([email protected]) if you would like a copy of your file. These documents may be useful for your portfolio. There is no fee for this service.

Below you will also find a chart which indicates which portions of your CCC application may help you to support the CRPO registration requirements.

As more information becomes available, this page will be updated. Do not hesitate to contact CCPA at [email protected] with your questions. We will attempt to answer all questions we receive as quickly as possible.

CRPO Portfolio - PowerPoint Model

Are you having trouble organizing your documents to create a portfolio to use in applying to the College of Registered Psychotherapists of Ontario? If so, this presentation is designed to introduce a Portfolio Design Option. The PowerPoint presentation was prepared by Trish McCracken, the Ontario Anglophone Director of CCPA.

Download the presentation

Professional Corporations Message

Learn about professional corporations in Ontario

Download the PDF

Frequently Asked Questions

These are questions and answers from a webinar presented on September 25th by Joyce Rowlands, Registrar of the CRPO called Grandparenting of Psychotherapists in Ontario – an Update on Regulation.

Please note that the answers are based on publicly available information as of September 25, 2013 and that this information may have changed. For the most up to date information, please visit the CRPO’s website.